🔥 Drops - 28th April 2022


This week, KnownOrigin are proud to bring you a curated selection of 4 freshly minted artworks from recent activity on the site. We present to you the works of artists Linco7n, Jessica Kaplan, Yahora and Huesader, who masterfully demonstrate a wide range of skills in the KnownOrigin art community.

White Swan by Linco7n

Linco7n brings a tangible sense of analogue grit to his animated digital composition in “White Swan”. The range of style and technique varies from hand drawn animation to video collage, all underpinned by a grungy texture and colour grade reminiscent of a dot matrix print. Compositionally the piece reminds us of an ancient Japanese woodblock with its integration of graphical elements framing a human subject.


"Blue Raspberry Sunset" by Jessica Kaplan Art

Jessica Kaplan breathes life into her medium of acrylic and spray paint with this dynamic, abstract expressionist piece. Nonrepresentational artworks such as this strip back our preconceived expectations of subject matter and narrative. Instead, this work creates a direct window between the viewer and artist, freezing her energy and expressive movements in a single moment in time, which plays out as our eyes follow the lines through the composition.



Physalis Bellasia (Belona) by Yahora

Yahora dazzles with his mastery of linework and form with this whimsical lifeform design. The piece is presented as a diagram possibly found in a field journal of an explorer of far-off worlds. Yahora also does a great job of justifying this lifeform to us, explaining its place within a fictional world. This method of storytelling makes us want to explore more of the forests of Voltar, to see what other plants and wildlife populate Yahora’s creation.


Real Life by Huesader

Huesader uses digital media to create this comedic scene of a TV in screensaver mode on a pile of refuse in a landfill. Like much of Huesader’s work it seems to be poking fun at consumer culture in the digital age, drawing attention to wastefulness, or indeed, the way we watch any old garbage to wind down after a long day. The irony of staring at a screen that reads “real life” feeds into this narrative beautifully, as the glitched screen is anything but real. Extra points for hiding the KnownOrigin logo in there at least twice.